A Madman’s Theodicy

…[the ancient inventors of names] would never have connected prophecy (mantike), which foretells the future and is the noblest of arts, with madness (manike), or called them both by the same name, if they had deemed madness to be a disgrace or dishonour; they must have thought that there was an inspired madness which was a noble thing; for the two words, mantike and manike, are really the same, and the letter t is only a modern and tasteless insertion. – Plato, Phaedrus 244c (circa 370 BC)

 

The blind will not gain their sight by opening their eyes

Not for the sins of the fathers

nor of previous generations

Why do the wicked prosper while the righteous cries out?

Like lambs sent to the slaughter

hopeful, faithful

through love

for salvation

What is this upside-down glory

of a murdered God?

How do you live

knowing

one day

on the third day

(just like that)

 

life still lives

 

and even death dies?

 


About the author: Lucas Coque is a Brazilian theology student in Montreal, QC. He is an agnostic Christian existentialist who wishes to make progressive theology accessible.

Photo by Louis Maniquet on Unsplash

 

Why does evil exist?

It’s a mad world.

Those were my thoughts Friday morning, after reading about a boy, three years old, who last year was tortured and beaten to death over a 3 day period, by his mother’s boyfriend as his mother watched and laughed… Throughout the day, I was filled with melancholy, reflecting on life’s seeming absurdity, and the pointlessness of such horrendous violence. Then, Paris happened. I began to cry. Continue reading Why does evil exist?

The God of Unbelievers #2: Absence

(If you’re interested, here’s part 1)

I arrived from work and entered my house, saw a few lights on and assumed my roommates were at home. I enter my room, change clothes, go to the kitchen prep something to eat, go downstairs get my laundry done, come back to the kitchen, and realize that everything is a bit too quiet. I call their names, nobody answers. I am, after all, alone.

Next day, I come home and all is dark, I don’t hear a sound, so I turn on my music and sit down to relax for a bit. I cook something, wear something comfortable, all is so good.

Hey man!

The musical silence inside my head is broken; I am not alone.

Light and darkness, presence and absence. My experience at home is but a shade of the dance that is life with(out) God. Continue reading The God of Unbelievers #2: Absence