Weightless Love

While looking through Facebook memories, I recently came across an old heated argument. The comments were filled with hate. In fact, the phrase “I HATE YOU!” was strewn throughout.

Of course, the proper Christian response to hate is love, or the Christian platitude “I love you in Jesus.” Like clockwork, that love-phrase was said each time a hateful comment appeared.

“I love you.”

Such simple words. It’s a paradox, really: deep meaning imbedded in a simple phrase.

I believe we’ve been fooled by this simplicity. We declare love to strangers without thought or concern for love’s profundity.

Making matters worse is our social media context. It’s easier than ever to say “I love you” or “I hate you.” We don’t need to see people’s faces or know their voices, yet we love and hate them–people we barely know or don’t know at all.

Looking through this old status, I asked myself: is there something deeper and unspoken going on? Continue reading Weightless Love

Crise Amoureuse

In many languages there’s two different concepts that, in English, we give the words love and like. To like something is to enjoy it, take pleasure from it, and feel affection towards it. Love is a stronger affection that is usually (if not always) tied to strong bonds, e.g. family, or to sexual desire.

In French those two concepts are conflated in the verb aimer. J’aime means both I love and I like, and some people hate that conflation, while others really aiment it. Continue reading Crise Amoureuse